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Summer Training. How to Choose a Training Program for the Summer?

Summer is a wonderful time, which is especially looked forward to, not only for school and college students but also for those who have connected their lives with sports. Summer brings us a lot of new opportunities for such entertainment as playing legal online casino, but also opportunities to maintain a great physical shape, pleasing the variety of options for training.

 

 

Most of them not only do our bodies good but also recharge our bodies with positive energy and give us great memories. Nevertheless, it is important to maintain the right balance between all types of exercises, taking into account the peculiarities of the summer period.

 

What Happens in Our Body During Summer Workouts?

With the advent of heat, the body is constantly under stress due to the need to change the usual mechanisms of thermoregulation. And sports exercises further aggravate the situation, because an increase in body temperature with intense exercise is inevitable. The burden of cooling the body falls primarily on the heart – each degree exceeding the norm, makes it contract about 10 beats per minute faster to ensure an optimal level of sweating. In addition, training in hot weather without taking precautions is fraught with heatstroke, as a result of which the body simply stops regulating the internal temperature.

 

Summer Training Programme

It is best to devote separate days to cardio training and strength training because the combination of the two types of exercises reduces the effect of both.

 

Monday (strength training)

As a warm-up – jogging in place with a high rise of the knees. More advanced athletes can handle dumbbells during exercise. Warm-up for 5 minutes.

 

Pull-ups on the bar (wide grip, hands-on the horizontal bar are wider than the shoulders). 3 sets of 12 pull-ups. For advanced athletes – with weights.

 

Pushups. 3 sets of 12 push-ups.

 

Weighted squats. 3 sets of 15-20 reps.

 

One-legged toe rise. 4 sets (2 for each leg) of 50 reps.

 

Raising the legs. From a prone position with your arms along your torso, lift your legs up. Slightly bending your knees, lift your hips and pelvis up as you inhale, directing your knees to your head, and exhale as you exhale. 2 sets of 15-20 reps.

 

Tuesday (Cardio)

Any cardio workout such as running, swimming, or cycling. It is best to train in the evening or morning when the air has not yet had time to warm up or the heat begins to subside. The duration of the workout is from 40 minutes to 1 hour.

 

Wednesday (Strength Training)

Warm-up: running in place.

 

Pull-ups with a reverse grip – hands on the horizontal bar are shoulder-width apart, palms facing you. 3 sets of 10 pull-ups.

 

Pushups. 3 sets of 12 push-ups.

 

Push-ups on chairs. Place two chairs back to back, shoulder-width apart. Holding the backs with your hands, lower yourself down as low as possible, fix the position, and rise back. 3 sets of 15 reps. To complicate the task, you can use the third chair instead of leg support.

 

Weighted lunges. 3 sets of 12-15 reps.

 

One-legged toe rise. 4 sets (2 for each leg) of 50 reps.

 

Raising the legs. 2 sets of 15-20 reps.

 

Thursday (cardio)

Outdoor cardio training (running, Nordic walking, yoga) for 40 minutes to 1 hour.

 

Friday (strength training)

As a warm-up – jogging in place with a high rise of the knees, 5 minutes.

 

Pull-ups on the bar (wide grip). 3 sets of 12 pull-ups. For advanced athletes – with weights.

 

Pushups. 3 sets of 12 push-ups.

 

Squats on one leg. 4 sets (2 for each leg) of 5 squats.

 

One-legged toe rise. 4 sets (2 for each leg) of 50 reps.

 

Raising the legs. 2 sets of 15-20 reps.

 

After consulting with a coach, you can include more serious strength training in your summer training program. But in this case (however, in any other), you need to make sure that there is a good air conditioner in the gym where you plan to train.

 

Saturday and Sunday (rest)

It is extremely important to give your body a few days to rest and recuperate.

 

Image: Karsten Winegeart on Unsplash